The Killers - Caution

The Killers – Als hätten sie es gewusst

Was für eine wunderbare Rückkehr der Alternative- und Indie-Rockband aus Las Vegas. The Killers sind zurück mit einer Hymne voller Pomp, Glamour und großartigen Gitarrenriffs. Dass Brandon Flowers noch nie ein Mann der leisen Worte war, wussten wir bereits seit Singles wie Mr. Brightside und Somebody Told Me. Doch erst durch ihre 2008er Single Human kam es in Deutschland zum absoluten Durchbruch. Von ihrem dazugehörigen Album Day & Age verkaufte die Band über drei Millionen Platten, doch danach wurde es unsteter bei den Jungs und veröffentlichten The Killers in den letzten zwölf Jahren mit Battle Born (2012) und Wonderful Wonderful (2017) gerade einmal zwei Alben. Nun sind The Killers mit Caution zurück und fegen uns regelrecht weg mit einem voluminösen Synthiesound, der durch einen ausufernden Einsatz des Schlagzeugs wieder zum typischen Bombastsong wird, den wir alle gewohnt sind und lieben. Vom Gefühl dürfte Caution sich bekannt anfühlen, legt der Song doch die gleiche Euphorie and den Tag, wie Human oder Mr. Brightside. Das dazugehörige Album Imploding The Mirage wird am 29. Mai veröffentlicht und überrascht mit einer erfrischend, hohen Anzahl an Gastmusikern. So sind, neben dem The War On Drugs-Produzenten Shawn Everett auch The War On Drugs-Frontsänger Adam Granduciel, k.d. lang, Fleetwood Mac-Gitarrist Lindsey Buckingham, sowie die New-Yorker-Indieband Lucius mit dabei und sorgen dafür, dass Imploding The Mirage eines der abwechslungsreichsten Alben der Bandgeschichte werden könnte. Mit Caution sorgen The Killers auf jeden Fall jetzt schon Mal dafür, dass wir die Tanzschuhe noch nicht all zu weit in den Schrank räumen werden. Und als hätten sie es gewusst, passt der Songtitel so treffend zur aktuellen Lage überall auf der Welt.

Gengahr - live@Maze Club Berlin

Gengahr – Getting rid of unnecessary parts – An interview

It was quite a mild but wet Thursday in February, when I met Felix and Hugh of Gengahr two days ago in Berlin Maze Club to have that interview with these two of one of currently best British Indie-keeping bands. In a very rough surrounding of Maze Club we talked about the influences of Jack Steadman. About handling expectations so as pressure and about their mixture of various numbers of genres.

 

 

 

SOML:
The first time I saw you was at the MELT Festival in mid-July 2015. That was around four weeks after releasing your debut album A Dream Outside. You played the Mainstage, with around 100 people in front of you and it was raining. Can you remember how it felt to be in that early phase of the band playing on that big stage?

Hugh:
Yeah, that was a strange show for us. That was probably the biggest stage we’ve played on at that stage of our career. And it was the festival with the fewest people we’ve played on a festival. So, it was a wash out. Everyone was hiding in their tents. And they filmed it and put it on TV which was actually good. But I think we were still loving life back then as we are now and it was a beautiful festival to play and an amazing surrounding. So, love to come back again and do it properly when it’s not pissing down.

Felix:
You summarized that one quite perfectly, really. It was a disappointing opportunity we were very excited about. But sadly sometimes the reality is just not quite what you had envisaged. But yeah, by nothing other than unfortunate weather circumstances.

 

 

SOML:
You guys started your music career in 2014 and 2015 where Indie based music was nearly dead. Especially in the UK and then Haydon Spenceley of the Clash Magazine just called you the saviors of British guitar music. So what interests me is: who has influenced you and where does your interest in guitar music come from?

Felix:
I think with guitar music influences, something that starts very early. We all have kind of similar backgrounds in music when it comes to our parents, I think. They were all that sort of children of the kind of prime time for British guitar music. You know The Stones and the Beatles. So, the hype of their kind have influenced us. And I think we all grew up on the background of listening to that. And lots of other folk music like John Martin, James Taylor, Joni Mitchell. And I feel like that is sort of somewhere the heart of the music we write were those influences still there. And we kind of expand of ourselves growing up, becoming teenagers. Start to listen to things like Nirvana and heavier guitar music where the guitar is less of a kind of a companying instrument and becomes a lot more the lead. So, there is also a kind of that throwing in. I think there was a lot of time obsessing and listening to bands like Smashing Pumpkins and with those guys in particular you can see the guitar is really a very direct lead instrument which I think is less obvious in a lot of the 60’s and 70’s music we like. 

 

Gengahr - live@Maze Club Berlin

Gengahr – live@Maze Club Berlin

SOML:
But you’re not all indie. You’ve started with a mixture of Psychedelic Rock, Indie and an atmospheric singing part. If we listen to your new album Sanctuary, there is still Indie and a few parts of that atmospheric singing. But also huge differences between the songs. Everything and More still has that psychedelic rock feeling, whereas songs like Anime, Icarus and Atlas Please are more Pop influenced and Heavenly Maybe or Soaking In Formula is even going to a Disco direction. What was your intention behind this diversity of sound?

Hugh:
I think we’ve always had aspects of those different genres in our music – in the other two albums. But they weren’t ever produced in a way to draw them out. So, I think with the recent album Sanctuary we made an effort to retain the early direction of the songs and pushed them further. I think we’re trying to make our album as diverse as possible without being too confused – I hope.

Felix:
I think a lot of it comes as well through the way this record was made. On previous albums you go into the studio, you set up the drums, you kinda have that sound of the room when you’re recording things. Despite what the genre the songs might be – there’ll always be that sort of continuous thread where the sound is quite similar. The way we made this record, a lot of time it was written and recorded within peoples’ bedrooms and stuff. So, it didn’t have that sort of linear production sound across the record. So, every song is kind of allowed to be itself a little bit more than perhaps it would had been if we recorded it in a more traditional fashion. 

 

 

SOML:
Also your songwriting has evolved during your band presence. Compared to the early time how does it feel today to write music and what does it mean to you?

Felix:
I think, naturally you always wanna feel as though you’re getting better. What I  certainly feel is though there is always so much to learn. Whenever you make an album you come out the other end a little wiser. With a few more tricks obviously, I think. The whole process of being in a band is one of growth and evolution. We’re always trying to do better what we’ve done before and try to make an album that you can be really, really proud of. 

Hugh:
Yeah, I think you can’t do the same thing twice. You try not to but it might come out similar. We always trying to do something different every album.

 

Gengahr - live@Maze Club Berlin

Gengahr – live@Maze Club Berlin

SOML:
Some songs are surprisingly direct and some others are more vague. You as a British band but also as every single band mate has experienced some challenging time in the past. How do personal or external experiences affect your songs?

Hugh:
Well, personal and external experiences, especially heavily emotional charged ones, naturally seek into ones composing. Whether that would be with lyrics or just tone and vibe of specific notes or chord productions. I think, we all had our ups and downs and I think they all help to the creative melting pot.

Felix:
I think you know I’ve to got to harness those emotions and try to turn it into something positive, I think. Some of the most amazing music is also the most heartbreaking. And I think there is a reason for that. The way a listener can connect and relate is something very powerful. Very different styles of music and of course with big, big pop tunes often there isn’t that connection but it still works for whatever of reason. But the sort of real pinnacle of great songwriting is when you have some which works on both levels: where it can kind of connect musically and emotionally. And that’s when you’re onto  a real winner. 

 

 

SOML:
In an interview you, Felix, described that – in some time – you wanted to put  all the songs you wrote on a solo record. What made you decide to not do this and instead make a new Gengahr record out of this?

Felix:
I’m not so tried to put all the songs onto a solo record. But when we finished working on Where Wildness Grows, I was already writing a lot of in the kind of headset to write and continue working. And we were all a little bit tired and fatigued at that point and I can sort of envisage perhaps the potential that certain band members wouldn’t really necessarily want to be a part of this next record. Or perhaps maybe they had enough and I was pleasantly surprised that I wasn’t right in that aspect. It did sort of take a few of us longer to kinda get back on board and get their head in the game than others. But we all kinda got there in the end. There was certainly a period where things were slightly more lonesome and less collaborative than they were at the end. 

 

Gengahr - live@Maze Club Berlin

Gengahr – live@Maze Club Berlin

SOML:
Your record label Liberator Music is home for independent bands and artists like Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs and RY X but also for big players like Kylie Minogue, CHVRCHES and alt-j. How do you position yourself in that surrounding? And talking about the future. Do you see a possibility to collaborate with one of these artists in future?

Hugh:
Yeah, never say never. Kylie Minogue can always do some back vocals on our tracks if she shows her pleases. We’ve signed to Liberator Music from the start. They’d been our Australian label before we were singed in the UK. And we made the decision with them to do a world wide release. We are really happy with that decision. They’ve been great, very supportive in all different realms. It’s a massive label in Australia and they’re making inroads in the rest of the world. So, it’s exciting to be part of their bigger plans and project. 

Felix:
Yeah, their new horizons. We’re the center of the new horizon. 

 

 

SOML:
You recently collaborated with Bombay Bicycle Clubs lead singer Jack Steadman. He produced Sanctuary. How did you get in contact with him?

Felix:
So, Jack is kind of an old friend of ours, really. Hugh and I both went to sixth form Collage. So, we met Ed, who’s the bass player in Bombay Bicycle Club and we were in the same music class. Music technology class, to be precise. And then we met Jack through going to kind of house parties. So, we met Jack when we were 17 or 18 years old and hadn’t seen a lot of each other, to be honest. We bumped into each other at a few festivals over the years. And we were talking about doing a one-off single. We wanted it to be kind of different I guess to what we’ve done before and find somebody to come on board who’d add something we didn’t perhaps already have within the four of us. So, the selection of Jack was quite an astute one in that sense. He isn’t just a great producer. Having another songwriter in the room I think helps push everybody to just try up their game a bit. You wanna make sure that you’re giving your best self in those circumstances. It doesn’t afford you the ability to sort of like rest on your laurels. It creates a really  a positively charged atmosphere when you have someone that you respect, not just as a producer but also as the writer in the room. After doing that stand-alone single we had a discussion about recording an album. And thankfully everyone was really excited about doing that. And here we are now.

Hugh:
Yeah, it’s a nice combination of old and new with Jack cause we have this familiarity with him because we go so far back. But also pushing ourselves, as Felix said, we never really had a proper producer in the room with us when we were working on records. It was a nice combination. 

 

 

SOML:
As a Bombay Bicycle Club listener I can hear in many songs the vibe of Jacks music. Was that turn in your music planned and what was different in working with Jack compared to your previous records?

Felix:
I think Jack has some very distinctive kind of patterns of play. He has created his own role in our band very efficiently. He’s very good in finding the right place to position himself. I think he never feels as though he was encroaching or in sort of writing any of the songs. But also it’s very astute when it comes to putting together and enhancing the arrangements. A lot the more loopy delayed stuff was come about through Jack I think more than anything. Those kinda little quirks that he does use in a lot of Bombay Bicycle Club stuff. We found to be quite effective tools in sort of spoosing up some of our arrangements as well I think. 

Hugh:
Yeah, cutting the crap. Getting rid off lots of unnecessary parts in arrangements that are not adding to the overall.

Felix:
I think, it’s probably the biggest strength he has, if we had to pick one, it would  probably is his sense of within the arrangements, I think. He’s got a very good ear for what should be in there and what isn’t necessary, I think.

 

Gengahr - live@Maze Club Berlin

Gengahr – live@Maze Club Berlin

SOML:
You’ve filmed the music video of Heavenly Maybe in Berlin? How come and what’s your relationship to Berlin?

Hugh:
We love Berlin. We’ve played many times over the years. We also visited just for holidays. We wanted to do it definitely not in the UK. Somewhere in Europe. And given we have quite a strong connection with Berlin, we thought that we would come here. We have friends here that were gonna help us out shooting the video. So it made sense, really. For Heavenly Maybe, the song is actually kinda disco song. So filming it in a discotheque made a lot of sense too. It’s all about partying to avoid or suppress your problems. And I think a lot of people come to Berlin to do that. So, we thought that would the right thing to do.

 

 

SOML:
Many bands having pressure by setting goals or being confronted with high expectations and failing. How do you work with expectations? That is: in your music, in your success or expectations with personal goals?

Felix:
It is a challenging predicament to find yourself in. I think of everybody will  probably feel very similar. Whether you’re sort of Ed Sheeran, whether you’re a band like us who are on their third album and still working tirelessly and touring as much as possible whilst juggling the rest of our lives. You always wanna feel is that you moving forward. We have our own personal expectations. We demand a lot of ourselves. But I think it’s important often to try and step back and have a look of the bigger picture. You know, you often gotta kinda say to yourself. Would your younger self be happy with where you are now. And I think often, we’re thankful enough to say Yes is the answer. We kinda have done a pretty good job. I think there is no harm in hoping for more and wishing for more.

Hugh:
Yeah, it’s a tricky one with expectations. Also for me personally. I think lowering expectations is always quite useful in all works of life. It can create mental health pressures by giving yourself to too high expectations. But it’s about finding the balance and wanting to progress and carry on doing what you doing in various ways. But without being hung up on specifics. 

Felix:
Don’t beat yourself up

Hugh:
Self compassion

Felix:
But also work pretty hard. (laughing)

 

 

 

 

Interview: Marten Zube

The Strokes - Bad Decisions

The Strokes – Zweiter Streich mit nostalgischen Gefühlen

Es ist erst wenige Tage her, da hatten The Strokes mit At The Door das erste Mal nach sieben Jahren wieder einen Song veröffentlicht und gleichzeitig für April ein neues Studioalbum angekündigt. Sollte das nicht schon genug zur Freude gewesen sein, dürfen sich die Fans natürlich auch über Livedates der US-Amerikanischen Band freuen. Und haben wir bei der ersten Singleveröffentlichung noch über die Richtung des neuen Albums The New Abnormal gerätselt, wird mit dem neuen Song Bad Decisions einmal mehr der Retro-Sound aus Punk, Indie und Rock klar. Dabei klingen Julian Casablancas und der Rest der Band so nostalgisch, als würde Bad Decisions bereits vor 20 Jahren veröffentlicht worden sein. Geschrieben von Casablancas ist da aber auch eine Melodie im Song wiederzuerkennen, die uns noch viel länger zurückdenken lässt. Denn auf Bad Decisions werden Elemente des 1980er-Billy Idol Songs Dancing With Myself verwendet, weshalb sich in den Credits des neuen Strokes-Songs Idol auch wiederfindet. Bad Decisions ist Indie-Rock in allerbester Manier und lässt uns völlig vergessen, dass die Band sieben lange Jahre nichts mehr veröffentlicht hatte.

Bloodhype - Violent Heart

Bloodhype – Mit Blut und Schweiß zum Hype

Es war im Herbst 2018, als dieser mystisch, dunkle Alternativerock für einen Moment inne halten ließ. Die Single Romeos der Berliner Band Bloodhype ließ aufhorchen. Mit einem epischen Soundbett, wabernden Synthies und Elmar Weylands Stimme, die gleichermaßen intensiv, rau und warm sowie bedrohlich und ausbrechend klang, hatten es Bloodhype innerhalb kürzester Zeit geschafft, die Aufmerksamkeit internationaler Blogs auf sich zu ziehen. Nun sind sie mit Violent Heart wieder da und zeigen, dass ihre Liebe zu dunklen Synthies gar noch stärker geworden ist. Mit einem ausladenden Sound aus Gitarren, Schlagzeug und Saxophon – der nach Gewinnern klingt – scheint es Christopher Kohl, Matt Müller, Erik Laser und Elmar Weyland genau in diese Richtung zu treiben. Dabei bleiben sie zu jeder Zeit präsent und lassen keinen Unterschied, zwischen deutschem Sound und dem der großen Amerikanischen und Britischen Bands, erkennen. 2020 wird für Bloodhype ein Schlüsseljahr werden. Werden sie den Durchbruch schaffen, oder bleiben sie in der Indie-Nische?! Das gilt es zu beobachten. Bloodhype haben mit ihrem angekündigten Debütalbum Modern Eyes – welches sie im Sommer veröffentlichen wollen und sowohl in den Berliner Hansa Studios, als auch in Kellerstudios in Berlin aufgenommen haben – und ersten Tourdates im Herbst 2020 zumindest die besten Vorraussetzungen, um sich diesem Ziel mit großen Schritten zu nähern. Und selbst internationale Termine sollen aktuell im Gespräch sein. Da scheint eine andere Richtung, als die zum Erfolg fast schon ausgeschlossen – wir bleiben dran!

San Cisco - Reasons

San Cisco – Zuckersüßes Ende einer Beziehung

San Cisco tauchen immer wieder mal, mit ihren poppig, klebrigen Indiesongs, auf der Tanzfläche einer jeden Indieplaylist auf. Waren sie mit ihrem zweiten Studioalbum Gracetown (2015) und der Single Run auf ihrem Höhepunkt, folgte mit dem dritten Album Water (2017) und der Leadsingle SloMo fast schon ein Angriff auf den Thron der Discopop-Band Scissor Sisters. Nun haben sie mit Flaws endlich wieder neues Material dabei und veröffentlichen am 27. März die EP Flaws. Diese wird die Single Reasons enthalten, welche die Band gerade veröffentlicht hat. Hierbei singen sie über den Moment, als man ausgesprochen hat, dass man Schluss machen wird. Mit einem befreienden You should let it go, let it go… wird dieser Moment auf Reasons fast schon euphorisch zelebriert und gibt den Weg frei, den wunderbar produzierten Indiepop-Song zu genießen. Denn vom Inhalt einmal abgesehen, begeistern San Cisco auf Reasons, wie auch schon auf ihren vorangegangenen Veröffentlichungen mit einem lebendigen Indiepop, der sich leichtfüßig und sorglos präsentiert. Wenige Wochen nach der Veröffentlichung ihrer EP kommen Jordi Davieson, Josh Biondillo und Scarlett Stevens dann wieder nach Europa und spielen im Mai auch zwei Konzert in Deutschland.

The Fratellis - Six Days In June

The Fratellis – Neues Album, neue Single

Man ist fast geneigt, zu sagen, dass die Fratellis endlich zurück sind. Doch trügt der Schein, denn eigentlich war die Band nie wirklich weg. Entgegen der Entwicklung in Deutschland, in dem die Band 2006 nur mit ihrem Debütalbum Costello Music in den Top-50 der Albumcharts landen konnte, haben es Jon, Barry und Mince Fratelli – ob einer dreijährigen Bandpause von 2009 bis 2012 – geschafft, fünf Alben zu veröffentlichen und damit zuletzt mit ihrem 2018er Album In Your Own Sweet Time auch wieder an den Erfolg ihrer ersten beiden Alben anknüpfen können und landeten auf Platz 5 der britischen Albumcharts. Nun haben The Fratellis mit Six Days In June eine erste neue Single veröffentlicht, die zum angekündigten sechsten Studioalbum Half Drunk Under a Full Moon gehört, welches die Band am 8. Mai 2020 veröffentlichen wird. Mit ihrem absoluten Überhit Chelsea Daggers der mittlerweile zum britischen Kulturgut gehört und im Laufe einer Nacht in jedem Pub mindestens einmal gesungen wird, haben sich die Jungs einen Platz an der Sonne des britischen Indies erarbeitet. So konnten sie sich auf den folgenden Alben ausprobieren und mit neuen Sounds arbeiten. Nun zeigen sich The Fratellis auf Six Days In June allerdings wieder in alter Stärke und veröffentlichen eine Single, die mit Trompeten, Gitarren und einem mitreißenden Beat wieder zum mitsingen einlädt. Damit werden The Fratellis hoffentlich auch wieder hierzulande deutlich öfter gespielt und begeistern mit einem bekannten und allseits beliebten Sound ihr Publikum.

The Strokes - At The Door

The Strokes – 7-Jährige Pause episch beendet

Die Nachricht verbreitete sich wie ein Lauffeuer – die US-Amerikanische Band The Strokes hat mit At The Door vorgestern die erste Single nach sieben Jahren ohne neue Musik veröffentlicht. Sorgten die Strokes Anfang der 2000er mit großen Indie-Hits, wie Last NightSomeday oder 12:51 für volle Tanzflächen, werden diese Songs auch heute noch auf jeder Indie-Party gespielt. Während es für die Band in den Jahren nach ihrem großen Erfolg zunehmend schwerer wurde, sich im Indie-Bereich an der Spitze zu halten, schafften es viele Bands – vor allem aus Großbritannien – an die Oberfläche und ganz nach oben. Nun sind seit ihrem letzten Album Comedown Machine (2013) sieben Jahre vergangen, in denen die Band zwar noch Konzerte spielte, aber so gut wie keine neue Musik mehr veröffentlichte. Doch immer wieder streute die Band über die Jahre die Nachricht, dass die Jungs um Julian Casablancas an einem neuen Album arbeiten würden – nur, um es kurze Zeit später wieder zu dementieren. Doch mit der Veröffentlichung vom fast sechs-minütigen Song At The Door betreten die Strokes eine Welt, die sich irgendwo zwischen Retro-Futurismus à la Tron und Science-Fiction-Epos einordnet. Mit starken Synthies, einem gänzlichen Verzicht der Gitarre und deutlichen Referenzen an die Franzosen von Daft Punk ist At The Door nichts geringeres, als ein Epos, das melancholisch und in Slow-Motion an uns vorbeizieht. Dabei sehen wir im Musikvideo Zusammenschnitte aus dem Zeichentrickfilm Watership Down – Unten am Fluss mit seinen verstörenden Bildern. The Strokes haben für den 10. April 2020 endlich ihr sechstes Studioalbum The New Abnormal angekündigt, das von Rick Rubin produziert wurde. Mit At The Door als erste Single dürfen wir also gespannt sein, wie sich das neue Album in voller Länge anhören wird.

Circa Waves - Move To San Francisco

Circa Waves – Schlag auf Schlag

Schaffte es der Song Movies noch bis in den Winter 2019/2020 hinein populär zu sein und durch die Blogs zu geistern, haben die Circa Waves mit Sad/Happy bereits ihr viertes Album veröffentlicht. Wenn man es genau nimmt, ist Sad/Happy sogar ein Doppelalbum, dessen erster Teil Happy am 10. Januar veröffentlicht wurde. Der zweite Teil Sad wird am 13. März folgen und zusammen schließlich als Doppelalbum veröffentlicht werden. Dabei dient die aktuelle Single Move To San Francisco als perfekter Teaser für ihren direkten Indiesound, der mit viel Gitarren und wildem Gesang die pure Freude ausstrahlt. Für Move To San Francisco haben sich die Circa Waves vom Instrument der Beatles beeinflussen lassen – dem Mellotron. Dazu kam noch der Drang nach einer Flucht und Pessimismus, der die Band nach San Francisco führte. Hier haben sie dann auch das passende Musikvideo aufgenommen und das ganze in einer Art Do It Yourself Manier zusammengeschnitten. Mit Move To San Francisco präsentiert sich die Band nur ein Jahre nach ihrem dritten Album What’s It Like Over There? in kreativer Höchstform und zeigt mit gleich zwei Alben, wie viel sie zu erzählen haben.

Giant Rooks - Watershed

Giant Rooks – Sound im Wandel

Die Giant Rooks haben über die letzten Jahre eine beachtliche Größe erreicht. Ganz aus sich heraus gewachsen, haben die fünf aus Nordrhein-Westfalen kommenden Musiker es geschafft, binnen nur zwei Jahren – seit ihrer Gründung 2014 – zur Vorband von The Temper Trap oder Kraftklub zu werden und verkaufen mittlerweile sogar die Berliner Columbiahalle aus. Dabei war es sicher hilfreich, dass am 1. Dezember 2019 eine Tatort Folge mit gleich drei Songs der Band über 9 Millionen TV-Zuschauer fand und somit bei einer nicht zu unterschätzende Zuschauerzahl Interesse weckte. Doch auch fernab dieser Zuspiele sind die Giant Rooks ein absoluter Garant für großartigen Indie aus Deutschland und spielen sich live in alle Herzen. Denn ihre Aufrichtigkeit und Direktheit kommt an. So wirken sie dem Publikum immer nah, zeigen Spielwut und genießen jedes Konzert sichtlich. Nach den drei EP’s The Times Are Bursting the Lines (2015), New Estate (2017) und Wild Stare (2019) wird es Zeit für ein Debütalbum – und dieser Weg wird gerade geebnet. Denn, dass die Band nicht stehen bleibt, zeigten sie im Herbst 2019 mit der Veröffentlichung des Songs King Thinking – der erstmals einen anderen Ton anschlug. Jetzt sind sie mit Watershed zurück und überzeugen mit einem – schon ziemlich passenden – Stadionsound, der sich deutlich größer anhört, als ihre bisherigen Songs. Mit einem Klavierspiel, treibenden Beats und mehrstimmigen Gesang begeistern Giant Rooks vollends und ist dabei das Kratzige in der Stimme des Frontsängers Frederik Rabe zugunsten einer wärmeren Stimmlage gewichen. Watershed neigt dazu, ein neues Kapitel der Giant Rooks einzuläuten und dürfte gleichzeitig große Hoffnungen auf ein baldiges Debütalbum schüren. Gleichzeitig füllt die kommende Europatour, die im April und Mai 30 Städte anlaufen wird, den Namen Rookery der nicht passender für das Debütalbum sein könnte.

Jeremias - Schon Okay

Jeremias – Das Funk-Phänomen

Mit der EP Du Musst An Den Frühling Glauben haben die vier Jungs von Jeremias im Herbst vergangenen Jahres ein unglaubliches Ausrufezeichen gesetzt. Mit ihrer Mischung aus lockeren Indie-Sounds, gepaart mit Funk und Pop haben sich die Hannoveraner durch Songs, wie Alles und Sommer in die Köpfe gespielt. Land auf, Land ab wurden sie mit offenen Armen empfangen und dürften auf unzähligen Radiokonzerten zeigen, wie die neue Lockerheit der jungen Wilden funktioniert. Denn gerade diese Lockerheit steht auch für den Sound der Band. Nachdem Jeremias im Dezember den Song Grüne Augen Lügen Nicht veröffentlichten und damit erstmals mit einem Sound überzeugten, der weiser und erwachsener klang, kehren sie nun mit ihrer neuesten Single Schon Okay wieder in das Muster der jungen Wilden zurück. Zwischen Leidenschaft und Gier, Hingabe und Gleichgültigkeit schwingt Schon Okay gekonnt durch treibend, funkige Gitarrensolos. Hinzu kommt, dass sich Frontmann Jeremias Heimbach auf Schon Okay stimmlich ausprobiert und mit einer großartigen Kopfstimme überzeugt. Gleichzeitig läutet die Band mit der neuen Single ihre bevorstehende Tour ein, die sie durch 18 deutsche Städte führen wird. Wer daher einen guten Mix aus Indie, Disco und Funk sucht ist bei Jeremias goldrichtig.